disease

1. noun /dɪˈziːz,dɪˈziz/
a) An abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort or dysfunction; distinct from injury insofar as the latter is usually instantaneously acquired.

The tomato plants had some kind of disease that left their leaves splotchy and fruit withered.

b) Any abnormal or harmful condition, as of society, peoples attitudes, way of living etc.

War is not mans great and terrible disease; war is a symptom, a result. The real disease is the virus of national sovereignty.

2. verb /dɪˈziːz,dɪˈziz/
To infect with a disease.

Whyll he yett speake, there cam won from the rulers off the synagogis housse, which sayde to hym: Thy doughter is deed, disease not the master.


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  • disease — n Disease, disorder, condition, affection, ailment, malady, complaint, distemper, syndrome denote a de ranged bodily state usually associated with or amounting to a loss of health. Disease in its usual and broadest use implies an impairment of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Disease — Dis*ease , n. [OE. disese, OF. desaise; des (L. dis ) + aise ease. See {Ease}.] 1. Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] So all that night they passed in great disease. Spenser. [1913 Webster] To shield thee …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disease — [di zēz′] n. [ME disese, inconvenience, trouble, sickness < OFr desaise, discomfort < des , DIS + aise, EASE] 1. any departure from health; illness in general 2. a particular destructive process in an organ or organism, with a specific… …   English World dictionary

  • Disease — Dis*ease , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Diseased}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Diseasing}.] 1. To deprive of ease; to disquiet; to trouble; to distress. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] His double burden did him sore disease. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To derange the vital… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disease — (n.) early 14c., discomfort, inconvenience, from O.Fr. desaise lack, want; discomfort, distress; trouble, misfortune; disease, sickness, from des without, away (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + aise ease (see EASE (Cf. ease)). Sense of sickness, illness in… …   Etymology dictionary

  • disease — I noun affliction, ailment, attack, bodily deviation from health, bout of sickness, breakdown, chronic disability, collapse, condition, contagion, defect, deterioration, disability, discomfort, disorder, distemper, epidemic, handicap, ill health …   Law dictionary

  • disease — [n] ailment, affliction ache, affection, attack, blight, breakdown, bug*, cancer, canker, collapse, complaint, condition, contagion, contamination, convulsions, debility, decrepitude, defect, disorder, distemper, endemic, epidemic, feebleness,… …   New thesaurus

  • disease — ► NOUN ▪ a disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms. DERIVATIVES diseased adjective. ORIGIN Old French desaise lack of ease …   English terms dictionary

  • Disease — Human disease redirects here. For the Slayer song, see Soundtrack to the Apocalypse. Flare up redirects here. For the Transformers character, see Flareup (Transformers). Medical condition redirects here. For the descriptive terminology using… …   Wikipedia

  • disease — diseasedly, adv. diseasedness, n. /di zeez /, n., v., diseased, diseasing. n. 1. a disordered or incorrectly functioning organ, part, structure, or system of the body resulting from the effect of genetic or developmental errors, infection,… …   Universalium

  • disease — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Condition of ill health Nouns 1. disease, illness, sickness, ailment, ailing; morbidity, infirmity, ailment, indisposition; complaint, disorder, malady; functional disorder. 2. condition, affliction,… …   English dictionary for students

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